Minnesota Corrections Employees Falling Through the Workers’ Compensation Cracks

State corrections employees in the State of Minnesota are facing a challenge when it comes to their workers compensation Minnesota workers are to receive when they are injured while at work.

Law enforcement officers, corrections officers, and firefighters put themselves in harm’s way and some wonder whether or not the laws need to change.

For instance, a corrections employee who is injured in a prison assault and cannot work could lose employee insurance. Workers’ compensation payments can also near their end and this means that the health insurance costs could skyrocket since health care is a part of workers’ compensation benefits while they are being enforced. However, it is these skyrocketing insurance costs that are forcing some workers to lose everything. Health insurance can go from just a couple of hundred dollars per month to nearly $2,000 per month. When a person cannot work, this is not an expense that they can deal with.

When a corrections officer is injured on the job, they are not always provided the affordable health care that they need. However, there is a state statute that mandates police officers and firefighters sustaining permanent injuries are able to receive affordable health care. This causes corrections officers to fall between the cracks when it comes to health insurance after an injury.

When these officers are injured on the job, the inmates that injure them still receive their health care, giving them their health and the overall care that they receive as inmates. The injured worker faces a lifetime of hurdles.

There are some individuals who hope to be heard during the next legislative session so that an injured corrections employee can receive health care without the un-affordable cost of insurance placing them in extreme debt and hampering their future. Those that can pay the insurance premiums for a while do so with retirement accounts and savings, rendering them broke. Even permanent total disability through workers’ comp is not necessarily permanent, even when a person has suffered an injury as severe as a traumatic brain injury.

Because these employees find themselves wondering what comes next, they feel that it is the end of the road for them and this has advocates putting the futures of these injured workers in the hands of the legislators so that changes can be made.